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Latest Report on Journalist Situation and the Modern Technology Aid

December 20, 2011

Latest Report on Journalist Situation and the Modern Technology Aid

In the INSI report published in New York Times, an unheadlined graph shows no fewer than 18 journalists in Iraq had been confiscated of belongings including laptops, mobile phones, and their journalist’s cameras. Again, their names are unknown, because they were locals, Iraqis singled out by Iraqis and without fear of arrest and punishment from that dysfunctional government. Said the UN: They are being “assassinated with utmost impunity”. In view of the spotlight the military in Iraq rightly attracts for any suspected violation of the rules of engagement, it has to be noted that in this conflict most of the underreported deaths are due to sectarian and religious hatreds, “terrorists, insurgents and other unidentified murderers” in INSI’s language.

For a complete list of their gadgets: iPad, Gadgets And Tablet Devices Chronicle

They have no respect, as they may well understand it, for the role of journalists as neutral observers. It does not help either when political leaders make use of these devices in the democracies recoil from that ideal.  Most of the mentioned devices are gadgets for modern media coverage.

See The Gadget Blog – Tech Updates and Mobile Devices

Media High-tech GadgetsMedia High-tech Gadgets

Reporters risking their lives in Iraq earned the odium that accompanies the telling of unpalatable truths. In the first Gulf War, CNN’s Peter Arnett, reporting from Baghdad as US missiles landed, was accused by members of Congress of giving “the demented dictator propaganda mouthpiece to over 100 nations.” The BBC, for doing the same, was denounced in Parliament as “The Baghdad Broadcasting Corporation”.

What can be done? The cause is not hopeless. Ireland set an example. Following the outcry in 1996 over the killing of Veronica Guerin, the government devised new laws to indict the leaders of the criminal gang who organized her murder. In 2005 in the troubled state of Mexico, its President Vincente Fox responded to protests by appointing a special prosecutor to investigate violence against journalists. Brazil convicted the killer of Tim Lopes on a 5 to 4 jury vote and he was sentenced to 28 and a half years in prison.

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